WWII Dornier recognition model

£450
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WWII Dornier recognition model WWII Dornier recognition model WWII Dornier recognition model WWII Dornier recognition model WWII Dornier recognition model WWII Dornier recognition model WWII Dornier recognition model WWII Dornier recognition model WWII Dornier recognition model

WWII Dornier recognition model

£450

WWII Bakelite and painted wood recognition model of a Dornier Do.18 flying boat.

1:72 scale.

Wingspan: 33.5 cm.

Length: 28 cm.

Height: 8 cm.

 

The Dornier Do 18 flying boat was developed for the Luftwaffe, although LuftHansa received five aircraft and used these for tests between the Azores and the North American continent in 1936, and on their mail route over the South Atlantic from 1937 to 1939. On 27–29 March 1938, a "Do 18 W" established a seaplane record, flying non-stop a straight distance of 8,391 km (5,214 mi) from Start Point, Devon to Caravelas in Brazil.

 

The first Recognition models started to be produced prior to WWII following a national movement to increase the public’s awareness of the then new aviation technology, this became known as `Air mindedness’ and was promoted at aviation events such as the Schneider Trophy and Cobham’s Flying Circus. During the early years of WWII, following confusion and friendly fire incidents such as the ‘Battle of Barking Creek’, aircraft recognition training was used to ensure that friendly fire incidents were avoided. The main users of aircraft recognition models were branches of the military, the Royal Observer Corps, Anti-aircraft gunners, and the Home Guard.