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Campbell–Stokes sunshine recorder.

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Campbell–Stokes sunshine recorder.

A Campbell–Stokes sunshine recorder. Circa 1934. 

The Campbell–Stokes recorder (sometimes called a Stokes sphere) is a kind of sunshine recorder. It was invented by John Francis Campbell in 1853 and modified in 1879 by Sir George Gabriel Stokes. The original design by Campbell consisted of a glass sphere set into a wooden bowl with the sun burning a trace on the bowl. Stokes's refinement was to make the housing out of metal and to have a card holder set behind the sphere. 

The unit is designed to record the hours of bright sunshine which will burn a hole through the card.

Height: 19 cm. - 7 1/2 in.